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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 77-81

Epidemiology and outcome of acute kidney injury in patients presenting to emergency department – Our experience


1 Department of Emergency Medicine, Sri Venkateswara Institute of Medical Sciences, Tirupati, Andhra Pradesh, India
2 Department of Nephrology, Sri Venkateswara Institute of Medical Sciences, Tirupati, Andhra Pradesh, India
3 Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care, Apollo Institute of Medical Sciences, Chittoor, Andhra Pradesh, India
4 Department of Biochemistry, Sri Venkateswara Institute of Medical Sciences, Tirupati, Andhra Pradesh, India

Correspondence Address:
M Madhusudan
Associate Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, Sri Venkateswara Institute of Medical Sciences, Tirupati 517 507, Andhra Pradesh
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/JCSR.JCSR_46_19

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Background: Compared to the developed world, the pattern of acute kidney injury (AKI) is different in tropics. The present study was undertaken to study the epidemiological profile and outcomes in AKI. Methods: This prospective observational study was conducted in a tertiary care teaching hospital in South India. Demographic details, detailed medical history, aetiological factors, comorbid conditions, prognostic factors and outcomes were studied. Acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II) and sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) scores were calculated at admission for every patient to know the prognosis. Results: A total of 193 patients who fulfilled the inclusion criteria were enrolled in the study. Majority of the patients were in their sixth decade of life. The mean age was 52.1 ± 14.8 years (male:female = 1.7:1). Hypertension (41.5%; n = 80) and diabetes mellitus (33.7%; n = 65) were the most common comorbid illnesses in our patients. The average duration of hospital stay was 8 days. AKI was secondary to medical causes in 69.4% (134/193), surgical causes in 25.4% (49/193) and obstetric is 5.18% (10/193). Renal replacement therapy was required in 56.4% (n = 109) of the study population. The mortality rate observed in our study was 21.8% (n = 42). The mean APACHE II score and mean SOFA score were found to be significantly higher in the non survivors compared to the survivors. Conclusions: Patients with AKI who have higher APACHE II or SOFA score should be carefully monitored and aggressively treated to reduce mortality.


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