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Table of Contents
CORRESPONDENCE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 114

Authors' response


1 Sri Padmavathi Medical College for Women, Sri Venkateswara Institute of Medical Sciences, Tirupati, Andhra Pradesh, India
2 Departments of Biochemistry, Sri Venkateswara Institute of Medical Sciences, Tirupati, Andhra Pradesh, India
3 Department of Endocrinology, Sri Venkateswara Institute of Medical Sciences, Tirupati, Andhra Pradesh, India

Date of Web Publication11-Nov-2019

Correspondence Address:
P V. L. N Srinivasa Rao
Senior Professor and Head, Department of Biochemistry, Sri Venkateswara Institute of Medical Sciences, Tirupati, Andhra Pradesh
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/JCSR.JCSR_60_19

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How to cite this article:
Nikhita D, Srinivasa Rao P V, Vaikkakara S. Authors' response. J Clin Sci Res 2019;8:114

How to cite this URL:
Nikhita D, Srinivasa Rao P V, Vaikkakara S. Authors' response. J Clin Sci Res [serial online] 2019 [cited 2019 Dec 9];8:114. Available from: http://www.jcsr.co.in/text.asp?2019/8/2/114/270757



We read the comments on our paper[1] by Mahmood Al-Mendalawi[2] with interest. The authors[1] have suggested the use of national reference values for elucidating the profile of disordered thyroid functions. We wish to clarify that in our study,[1] serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) value level of 0.35-5.5 mIU/L was considered to be the normal range; and values >5.5 mIU/L were considered to be elevated. The age- and gender-specific reference ranges proposed by Marwaha et al.[3] have been derived from Indian subjects and could thus be applicable. However, the authors did not find any significant difference in FT3 and TSH levels in between the genders in the respective age groups although the values were higher in women in the sixth decade compared to men.[3] The 95th centile and 97th centile for TSH in normal healthy Indian women aged 18–35 years (the youngest age group mentioned) in the study by Marwaha et al.[3] are 3.7 and 3.8 mIU/L, respectively. This value of TSH would be a rough approximation for application to the girls with the age group of 17–19 years that we studied. Applying the cutoff value of 3.7 mIU/L or above to our data, the number of women with hypothyroidism was 10 students in 70, thereby giving a prevalence of 14.3%. With the cutoff of 3.8 or above, the prevalence was the same (n = 10, 14.3%). This proportion is similar to the observations reported in another study[4] from South India, which reported mild elevation in TSH levels (4.5–10 mIU/L) in 9.5% of young females. However, the reference ranges used clinically are 0.35–5.5 mIU/L. However, the reference ranges can be method-specific. The method used in the study by Marwaha et al.,[3] as well as in the study from South India,[4] was electrochemiluminescence while we have used chemiluminescence method. A study[5] comparing both the methods observed the analytical reference range for chemiluminescence (Architect) and electrochemiluminescence (Cobas) to be 0.35–4.9 mIU/L(μIU/mL) (n = 549) and 0.27–4.20 mIU/L (μIU/mL) (n = 516) in an Indian population. The reference range used in the present study thus matches with the method used, and thus, the results obtained in our study[1] can be viewed as correct. We appreciate Al-Mendalawi[2] for highlighting the importance of applying age- and gender-specific reference ranges.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Nikhita D, Srinivasa Rao PL, Suresh V. Screening for thyroid disorders in medical undergraduate students. J Clin Sci Res 2018;7:94-6.  Back to cited text no. 1
  [Full text]  
2.
Al-Mendalawi MD. Screening for thyroid disorders in medical undergraduate students. J Clin Sci Res 2019;8:113.  Back to cited text no. 2
  [Full text]  
3.
Marwaha RK, Tandon N, Ganie MA, Mehan N, Sastry A, Garg MK, et al. Reference range of thyroid function (FT3, FT4 and TSH) among Indian adults. Clin Biochem 2013;46:341-5.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Velayutham K, Selvan SS, Unnikrishnan AG. Prevalence of thyroid dysfunction among young females in a South Indian population. Indian J Endocrinol Metab 2015;19:781-4.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Sarkar R. TSH comparison between chemiluminescence (Architect) and electrochemiluminescence (Cobas) immunoassays: An Indian population perspective. Indian J Clin Biochem 2014;29:189-95.  Back to cited text no. 5
    




 

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