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CORRESPONDENCE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 7  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 151

An unusual case of sphenoid wing meningioma and adenocarcinoma of the caecum


Department of Paediatrics, Al-Kindy College of Medicine, University of Baghdad, Baghdad, Iraq

Date of Web Publication8-Apr-2019

Correspondence Address:
Mahmood Dhahir Al-Mendalawi
Department of Paediatrics, Al-Kindy College of Medicine, University of Baghdad, Baghdad
Iraq
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/JCSR.JCSR_6_19

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How to cite this article:
Al-Mendalawi MD. An unusual case of sphenoid wing meningioma and adenocarcinoma of the caecum. J Clin Sci Res 2018;7:151

How to cite this URL:
Al-Mendalawi MD. An unusual case of sphenoid wing meningioma and adenocarcinoma of the caecum. J Clin Sci Res [serial online] 2018 [cited 2019 Jun 20];7:151. Available from: http://www.jcsr.co.in/text.asp?2018/7/3/151/255673



In their interesting case report, Goudihalliet al.[1] described a 76-year-old male patient diagnosed with left lateral sphenoid wing meningioma who underwent total excision of the tumour. Postoperatively, the patient developed intestinal obstruction due to perforation of colonic growth proved to be adenocarcinoma. In the view of the rarity of development of sequential tumours in a particular patient, I presume that the authors ought to consider defective immune status in the studied patient. Among defective immune states, infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the leading cause. My presumption is based on the following point. It is obvious that immunocompromised individuals are more susceptible to various types of tumours compared to healthy controls. The increased susceptibility has been attributed to different factors, namely impaired immunity, co-infection with oncogenic viruses and life extension due to the use of antiretroviral treatment.[2] The available data pointed out to HIV seroprevalence of 0.26% compared with a global average in India is 0.2%.[3] Hence, arranging for HIV testing, CD4+ T-lymphocyte count and viral load estimation was expected. If these tests were to disclose HIV reactivity, the case in question could be truly considered a novel case report in India. This is because sequential tumours in HIV-positive patient has been rarely reported in the literature.[4] Regrettably, the patient succumbed to septic shock before considering HIV testing.

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Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Goudihalli SR, Pathak A, Brar R, Kapoor R, Malhotra M. An unusual case of sphenoid wing meningioma and adenocarcinoma of the caecum. J Clin Sci Res 2017;6:249-52.  Back to cited text no. 1
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2.
Valencia Ortega ME. Malignancies and infection due to the human immunodeficiency virus. Are these emerging diseases? Rev Clin Esp 2018;218:149-55.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Paranjape RS, Challacombe SJ. HIV/AIDS in India: An overview of the Indian epidemic. Oral Dis 2016;22 Suppl 1:10-4.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Skopelitis E, Panayiotakopoulos GD, Kontos AN, Androulaki A, Hatzianastassiou D, Hatzimanolis E, et al. Sequential development of triple malignancy in an HIV-positive patient. J Chemother 2003;15:97-8.  Back to cited text no. 4
    




 

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